Tag Archives: value

SLA2014: How YOU Doin’? Part 1 – general thoughts on the Vancouver conference

Yes I know it’s been a while since I last did a post. Well, here it goes! This is going to be split into a few posts because I’ve got a lot to put out there for contemplation and maybe reaction.

This past week I participated in the SLA2014 annual conference in Vancouver, BC. There are so many positives to participating (note, I don’t say attend because passiveness at a conference doesn’t get you very much payback). Anyway, when I go to these events I look forward to seeing friends and colleagues from all over the world, share ideas, discuss issues, learn a few things, talk to vendor partners and potential new ones who can help me with needs of my library services and institution, maybe share a few pearls of wisdom – ok share a lot whether you want to hear them or not ;-), and have some fun too.

A side note — When I arrived at LAX and got off the parking lot shuttle I walked to the entrance door for Air Canada and was struck really hard in the leg by a luggage trolley that a kid was swinging around. I felt like Nancy Kerrigan when she was hit with that bat by Tonya Harding’s boyfriend. It soon hurt so bad and continued to hurt on and off during most of the conference. Put me out of sorts a bit and I didn’t dance much at all — that’s right, I didn’t dance but a little bit Sunday night at a dinner event and not at all at the IT dance party.

OK back to the conference. I have to talk about the good stuff first because that is so unlike me. Yep I said it! Overall the conference was worth the trip as it usually is. There is also some stuff that isn’t so good and I’ll mention a few briefly but the details will be covered in future posts.

Cameron and I on the train from Vancouver airport to downtown. Inexpensive and a nice way to get into town in reasonable time.

Cameron and I on the train from Vancouver airport to downtown. Inexpensive and a nice way to get into town in reasonable time.

After stopping to pick up my conference registration and dropping off stuff at the hotel (more on that in a short bit) I went to the First Timers event hosted by SLA Fellows. From there we went to our annual dinner. This time it was the Cactus Club Cafe along the harbor. Everyone had good food – well except I got the tough steak, but they covered my drinks so it worked out. Anyway, here are a few pics from that night:

SLA Fellows Dinner in Vancouver

Ann, Mary Ellen, James and others at the SLA Fellows Dinner in Vancouver

SLA Fellows Dinner in Vancouver

Kate, Bill, Monica and Mary at the SLA Fellows Dinner in Vancouver

SLA Fellows Dinner in Vancouver

Peter, Ruth, Wei, Dorothy and others at the SLA Fellows Dinner in Vancouver

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

During the conference itself I spent a lot of my time in the INFO-EXPO on purpose so I could get the information I needed for projects at work. I was on a mission. If I found time for sessions (and there were a lot of good ones to try and attend), I would go to them – I really didn’t have the time other than some unit business meetings and presentations in them. As a result I brought back key items for use at work regarding discovery tools, updates on content management systems, new tools for citation management at the institution level, possible different ways to pay for and deliver content, a small bit of swag, and nice conversations with vendor partners and colleagues during dinners around town.

Dinner sponsored by Soutron Global at the Salmon House across the bay. Fun evening with happy people, good food, fun entertainer on a synthesizer, incredible views of Vancouver and more, and a bit of dancing.

Dinner sponsored by Soutron Global at the Salmon House across the bay. Fun evening with happy people, good food, fun entertainer on a synthesizer, incredible views of Vancouver and more, and a bit of dancing.

Not so good was the total mess up by SLA Housing Bureau that should never, ever, ever be used again. I tried reserving a room just a few days after housing registration opened up. Nope, ALL rooms at the conference hotels were unavailable except for a waiting list. The kicker was that some nights were available but NOT the Tuesday night. WTF?!!! The conference was scheduled until 6PM Tuesday, so how many people were going to be able to leave that day if they wanted to attend the business meeting and final panel? (Yep I used the ‘attend’ word and more on that in a future post — a LOT to say on that topic)
I tried 3 days in a row to find a room and was even willing to pay the ‘harbor view’ price but nothing changed. Others told me they even called and got no help along with big attitude. Apparently a few weeks later some rooms became available but not for long. Didn’t know that until too late. Good thing my roommate’s company had a block of rooms so we had some place to stay. It was the Westin Bayshore. Nice place and rooms, though the closet was in the bathroom — yep, in the bathroom. I’ve traveled all over the world, but never saw that before! Bad news: it was one of the farthest places from the Convention Center.

Yachts docked in Vancouver harbor with Westin Bayshore hotel in background

Yachts docked in Vancouver harbor with Westin Bayshore hotel in background

An up side to that was I got some nice exercise and walks along the harbor shoreline and through the park paths and enjoyed seeing the people and scenery.

Park along Vancouver Bay shoreline

Park along Vancouver Bay shoreline

 

Mother Mallard duck guiding her duckling back to a nearby pond. So cute! Everyone gave them plenty of room and let them proceed to the side before continuing on.

Mother Mallard duck guiding her duckling back to a nearby pond. So cute! Everyone gave them plenty of room and let them proceed to the side before continuing on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I know I’ve posted some pics and talked about stuff out of chronological order, but that’s the way it is. Almost done for this post and look for “SLA: How YOU Doin’? Part 2: The Business Meeting that Wasn’t”. I’ll be getting into some tough love folks, tough love!

Lastly, a good decision was to buy some Godiva chocolate from the Duty Free shop on the way home. Jumped right to the end but it was too good to wait! I had to use at least some of that leftover Canadian cash. What? I walked by all the alcohol and went for chocolate — the folks at work are VERY glad I did!

Holding tablet while giving a presentation isn’t creative

Anyone who knows me knows I enjoy technology though I’m not as early an adapter as others who must have the latest thing the day it is available. However, lately I’ve seen more people speak in front of an audience without a podium or table holding onto their iPads or equivalent tablets. Last week I heard a talk by an author about creativity and the only thing ‘creative’ was he read notes and excerpts from his book off his tablet holding it awkwardly on his forearm. If the tablet is being used to its potential to access interesting apps to show or other uses, great. But if it is only a replacement for simple index cards or similar ‘old fashioned notes’ vehicle, what are you trying to convey? OK, I get it, you have the latest gadget, it cost a bunch of money, maybe you want to write it off as a business expense, and at the very least want to show it off. However, that in itself is not creative or practical. It also looks quite awkward and the audience is waiting for it to careen off your forearm and crash onto the floor.
Let’s think about the tools we use, how we use them, and what impression we want to give to those viewing our use. Sometimes we get it right, but more and more people get it wrong. Let’s not be those latter people!

What is the VALUE of Professional Associations to new and aspiring professionals?

The following was originally posted on 01 May 2011 on the SLA Future Ready 365 Blog site
(http://futureready365.sla.org/05/01/the-value-of-professional-associations/)

I am re-posting it here because I wrote it and I think it is imperative that this be more widely disseminated and discussed. What do you think?

I started out a blog submission talking about how success in explaining and showing value of information services in an organization can be achieved one conversation at a time. While formulating this submission, I had an experience that I thought should supercede that one, namely an understanding of the value of our professional affiliations and memberships by graduate students and new professionals. If they don’t feel an association is worth their time and money for enhancing their career, how can we expect them to see our association as a resource to help them on the job and in their future growth?

I recently had a lengthy, lively discussion about the value of membership in SLA and other professional information organizations with a graduate student. His comments included:

“I am told to join a professional library association because I won’t get a job unless I do – I think that is extortion.” He asked “would you hire me if I wasn’t a member of SLA or another organization?” First I said “no” which he of course said “See!!” Then I clarified by saying I would have a concern as to WHY he didn’t join any association as that would signal to me he may be a good worker but maybe not a longer term contributor to the profession, so I would need to understand more about that. Well, we had quite a lively and noisy interaction over that one!!
“Don’t the associations understand that I have a choice in investment between education and other things such as eventually buying a home?” That ”because I chose education, I will be paying back a huge debt for a long period of time and maybe never be able to buy a home? How can membership in an association help with that?”
“Why are there so many student groups for a relatively small cohort — can’t there be one student group that can be affiliated with multiple associations? It seems the same 20 people out of 100 belong to the various student groups and the rest of the students see no value in joining any of them.”
“Our student group does regular service in prison libraries and other socially conscious activities that were started BY students, not the library school faculty or professional associations. What are associations doing like this? Why should we join an association to conform to what they are already doing when we, the students, are doing more for society than those associations?” I indicated an example of how SLA had a full day of service in New Orleans and he said “big deal, one day — we do ongoing service!” Oooh, boy, we had more lively discussion on this one too!!
“Isn’t it time for ALA, SLA, ASIS&T and all to think about merging and working together for the good of the profession instead of being splintered like they have been for so long? Is there any reason why these groups should still be separate?”
There were some more, but I lost track!!

Anyway, after agreeing to start the conversation over and hear out each side, we ultimately centered around this point that we both agreed was valid:

* It is clear the professional associations, the professionals in those associations, and professors in library schools (and their equivalent) are not conveying the value gained from membership and active participation.

In speaking with a professor at a major library school, she agreed that more and more library schools have instructors who are not in the library profession and/or who don’t belong to a professional organization, so they have no context or experience to convey about the value of associations to their students. As a result, students don’t know much if anything about associations and do not join or actively participate in them.

So here is the challenge. What are the key values of a professional association that will ring true to the current graduate student and new information professional? This is not about who or what is right or wrong, but rather being able to articulate the value and help our new colleagues be “Future Ready.”

Again, what do YOU think?

Marketing our value: the SLA Alignment Initiative

Be sure to check out part one of my article in the March/April 2010 issue of  MLS Marketing Library Services on marketing the value of librarians and information professionals. In it I talk about the background of the SLA Alignment Initiative, the highly discussed and volatile proposal for a name change to SLA, and how the initiative has provided information and tools to help us market our value to our managers, leadership or whomever.

MLS Marketing Library Services Newsletter March-April 2010

In the second part of the article, to appear in the May/June issue, I will discuss the next phase of the Alignment Initiative and how you can apply all this information to your own working environment. Watch for it!!